Discussion:
Wayland, Weston and libinput to patchwork?
(too old to reply)
Pekka Paalanen
2014-10-01 08:45:26 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

at least with Wayland and Weston, we have bit of hard time tracking the
patches that need attention. I think I am currently the only one who
actually keeps a backlog, my backlog is not public, and I cannot be a
maintainer 100% all the time, so this won't scale or work for too long.

How about we started using http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/ ?

Apparently it works fine for Mesa et al., right?

I believe it picks up patch emails from the mailing lists automatically
and creates issues, and with a git hook at fd.o repos, a git-push can
automatically close issues.

There was also some command line tool for the patchwork database, IIRC.

It wouldn't change how we work: patches are good in the mailing list,
inline, we would still do review on the mailing list, etc. We would
just have an automatically maintained list of open patches.

For the record, this was the announcement for Mesa:
http://lists.freedesktop.org/archives/mesa-dev/2013-November/049293.html

Wayland-devel mailing list gets patches to three different projects:
Wayland, Weston, and libinput. Is this a problem? Sometimes it is hard
for even humans to see which repository a patch is targeting.

From a quick chat with tfheen, it seems like patchwork assumes 1:1
between mailing lists and projects. OTOH, it looks like Xorg project in
patchwork gets patches to a myriad of different git repos, and you can
filter search results based on subject.

People do already usually use something like "[PATCH weston v7]" to
identify the target, so filtering by subject should mostly work.

What do you think?

Would libinput want to be in patchwork?


Thanks,
pq
Marek Chalupa
2014-10-03 08:41:37 UTC
Permalink
I like it :)

Regards,
Marek
Post by Pekka Paalanen
Hi,
at least with Wayland and Weston, we have bit of hard time tracking the
patches that need attention. I think I am currently the only one who
actually keeps a backlog, my backlog is not public, and I cannot be a
maintainer 100% all the time, so this won't scale or work for too long.
How about we started using http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/ ?
Apparently it works fine for Mesa et al., right?
I believe it picks up patch emails from the mailing lists automatically
and creates issues, and with a git hook at fd.o repos, a git-push can
automatically close issues.
There was also some command line tool for the patchwork database, IIRC.
It wouldn't change how we work: patches are good in the mailing list,
inline, we would still do review on the mailing list, etc. We would
just have an automatically maintained list of open patches.
http://lists.freedesktop.org/archives/mesa-dev/2013-November/049293.html
Wayland, Weston, and libinput. Is this a problem? Sometimes it is hard
for even humans to see which repository a patch is targeting.
From a quick chat with tfheen, it seems like patchwork assumes 1:1
between mailing lists and projects. OTOH, it looks like Xorg project in
patchwork gets patches to a myriad of different git repos, and you can
filter search results based on subject.
People do already usually use something like "[PATCH weston v7]" to
identify the target, so filtering by subject should mostly work.
What do you think?
Would libinput want to be in patchwork?
Thanks,
pq
_______________________________________________
wayland-devel mailing list
wayland-devel at lists.freedesktop.org
http://lists.freedesktop.org/mailman/listinfo/wayland-devel
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Karsten Otto
2014-10-03 09:07:46 UTC
Permalink
Looks like this could be really helpful. I find it difficult enough to track the state of my own patches in the list, can't imagine what its like for a maintainer. Also, it could give newcomers a good idea of what's going on in the projects, and where to jump in to help.

Cheers, Karsten
Giulio Camuffo
2014-10-03 10:00:05 UTC
Permalink
+1 from me too. I have never used patchwork, but any tracking tool
would be a huge improvement.
Post by Pekka Paalanen
Hi,
at least with Wayland and Weston, we have bit of hard time tracking the
patches that need attention. I think I am currently the only one who
actually keeps a backlog, my backlog is not public, and I cannot be a
maintainer 100% all the time, so this won't scale or work for too long.
How about we started using http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/ ?
Apparently it works fine for Mesa et al., right?
I believe it picks up patch emails from the mailing lists automatically
and creates issues, and with a git hook at fd.o repos, a git-push can
automatically close issues.
There was also some command line tool for the patchwork database, IIRC.
It wouldn't change how we work: patches are good in the mailing list,
inline, we would still do review on the mailing list, etc. We would
just have an automatically maintained list of open patches.
http://lists.freedesktop.org/archives/mesa-dev/2013-November/049293.html
Wayland, Weston, and libinput. Is this a problem? Sometimes it is hard
for even humans to see which repository a patch is targeting.
From a quick chat with tfheen, it seems like patchwork assumes 1:1
between mailing lists and projects. OTOH, it looks like Xorg project in
patchwork gets patches to a myriad of different git repos, and you can
filter search results based on subject.
People do already usually use something like "[PATCH weston v7]" to
identify the target, so filtering by subject should mostly work.
How does this work if someone forgets the "weston" though? I know it
happened to me at least one time.
Post by Pekka Paalanen
What do you think?
Would libinput want to be in patchwork?
Thanks,
pq
_______________________________________________
wayland-devel mailing list
wayland-devel at lists.freedesktop.org
http://lists.freedesktop.org/mailman/listinfo/wayland-devel
Pekka Paalanen
2014-10-03 11:31:11 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 3 Oct 2014 13:00:05 +0300
Post by Giulio Camuffo
+1 from me too. I have never used patchwork, but any tracking tool
would be a huge improvement.
Post by Pekka Paalanen
Hi,
at least with Wayland and Weston, we have bit of hard time tracking the
patches that need attention. I think I am currently the only one who
actually keeps a backlog, my backlog is not public, and I cannot be a
maintainer 100% all the time, so this won't scale or work for too long.
How about we started using http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/ ?
Apparently it works fine for Mesa et al., right?
I believe it picks up patch emails from the mailing lists automatically
and creates issues, and with a git hook at fd.o repos, a git-push can
automatically close issues.
There was also some command line tool for the patchwork database, IIRC.
It wouldn't change how we work: patches are good in the mailing list,
inline, we would still do review on the mailing list, etc. We would
just have an automatically maintained list of open patches.
http://lists.freedesktop.org/archives/mesa-dev/2013-November/049293.html
Wayland, Weston, and libinput. Is this a problem? Sometimes it is hard
for even humans to see which repository a patch is targeting.
From a quick chat with tfheen, it seems like patchwork assumes 1:1
between mailing lists and projects. OTOH, it looks like Xorg project in
patchwork gets patches to a myriad of different git repos, and you can
filter search results based on subject.
People do already usually use something like "[PATCH weston v7]" to
identify the target, so filtering by subject should mostly work.
How does this work if someone forgets the "weston" though? I know it
happened to me at least one time.
You would still see it in patchwork's unfiltered list, i.e. the default
view.


Thanks,
pq
Daniel Stone
2014-10-03 13:43:03 UTC
Permalink
Hi,
Post by Pekka Paalanen
On Fri, 3 Oct 2014 13:00:05 +0300
Post by Giulio Camuffo
Post by Pekka Paalanen
How about we started using http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/ ?
Apparently it works fine for Mesa et al., right?
I believe it picks up patch emails from the mailing lists automatically
and creates issues, and with a git hook at fd.o repos, a git-push can
automatically close issues.
There was also some command line tool for the patchwork database, IIRC.
It wouldn't change how we work: patches are good in the mailing list,
inline, we would still do review on the mailing list, etc. We would
just have an automatically maintained list of open patches.
http://lists.freedesktop.org/archives/mesa-dev/2013-November/049293.html
Post by Giulio Camuffo
Post by Pekka Paalanen
Wayland, Weston, and libinput. Is this a problem? Sometimes it is hard
for even humans to see which repository a patch is targeting.
From a quick chat with tfheen, it seems like patchwork assumes 1:1
between mailing lists and projects. OTOH, it looks like Xorg project in
patchwork gets patches to a myriad of different git repos, and you can
filter search results based on subject.
People do already usually use something like "[PATCH weston v7]" to
identify the target, so filtering by subject should mostly work.
How does this work if someone forgets the "weston" though? I know it
happened to me at least one time.
You would still see it in patchwork's unfiltered list, i.e. the default
view.
It's totally possible to split and filter repos by hacking parsemail.py
(so, doable, just annoying to preserve); on the other hand, I don't see
that it's possible to move patches between projects, at least not without
manual bashing inside the Django admin interface. So while I could
implement a Wayland/Weston split, I've opted not to since misplaced patches
would get dumped in the wrong side of things too often. But if it becomes a
problem later on, we can split them easily enough. Ditto libinput/xkbcommon.

Cheers,
Daniel
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Bill Spitzak
2014-10-03 19:28:26 UTC
Permalink
Seems to me that blank almost always means weston, could blank ones be
put in Weston's list?

Can it recognize a new version of the same patch? Conversely if a new
block of patches has in-reply-to set to one of the messages from an old
block, does it realize it is a new version of the patch?
Post by Pekka Paalanen
Post by Giulio Camuffo
How does this work if someone forgets the "weston" though? I know it
happened to me at least one time.
You would still see it in patchwork's unfiltered list, i.e. the default
view.
Jonas Ådahl
2014-10-04 14:58:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pekka Paalanen
Hi,
at least with Wayland and Weston, we have bit of hard time tracking the
patches that need attention. I think I am currently the only one who
actually keeps a backlog, my backlog is not public, and I cannot be a
maintainer 100% all the time, so this won't scale or work for too long.
How about we started using http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/ ?
Apparently it works fine for Mesa et al., right?
I believe it picks up patch emails from the mailing lists automatically
and creates issues, and with a git hook at fd.o repos, a git-push can
automatically close issues.
There was also some command line tool for the patchwork database, IIRC.
It wouldn't change how we work: patches are good in the mailing list,
inline, we would still do review on the mailing list, etc. We would
just have an automatically maintained list of open patches.
http://lists.freedesktop.org/archives/mesa-dev/2013-November/049293.html
Wayland, Weston, and libinput. Is this a problem? Sometimes it is hard
for even humans to see which repository a patch is targeting.
From a quick chat with tfheen, it seems like patchwork assumes 1:1
between mailing lists and projects. OTOH, it looks like Xorg project in
patchwork gets patches to a myriad of different git repos, and you can
filter search results based on subject.
People do already usually use something like "[PATCH weston v7]" to
identify the target, so filtering by subject should mostly work.
What do you think?
Would libinput want to be in patchwork?
The patch traffic for libinput is fairly low compared to wayland/weston
so I believe there is no urgent need, but still if patchwork can help
keeping track, maybe we can still try it out. The issue I see is that it
would not be as automatic as one could hope if the one who pushes don't
want to resubmit the patches on the ML after for example correcting
minor review issues. Have I understood it correctly that this would cause
patchwork not to close the issue? If that is the case, I think patchwork
would cause more burden than benefit right now.


Jonas
Post by Pekka Paalanen
Thanks,
pq
_______________________________________________
wayland-devel mailing list
wayland-devel at lists.freedesktop.org
http://lists.freedesktop.org/mailman/listinfo/wayland-devel
Peter Hutterer
2014-10-05 12:55:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonas Ådahl
Post by Pekka Paalanen
Hi,
at least with Wayland and Weston, we have bit of hard time tracking the
patches that need attention. I think I am currently the only one who
actually keeps a backlog, my backlog is not public, and I cannot be a
maintainer 100% all the time, so this won't scale or work for too long.
How about we started using http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/ ?
Apparently it works fine for Mesa et al., right?
I believe it picks up patch emails from the mailing lists automatically
and creates issues, and with a git hook at fd.o repos, a git-push can
automatically close issues.
There was also some command line tool for the patchwork database, IIRC.
It wouldn't change how we work: patches are good in the mailing list,
inline, we would still do review on the mailing list, etc. We would
just have an automatically maintained list of open patches.
http://lists.freedesktop.org/archives/mesa-dev/2013-November/049293.html
Wayland, Weston, and libinput. Is this a problem? Sometimes it is hard
for even humans to see which repository a patch is targeting.
From a quick chat with tfheen, it seems like patchwork assumes 1:1
between mailing lists and projects. OTOH, it looks like Xorg project in
patchwork gets patches to a myriad of different git repos, and you can
filter search results based on subject.
People do already usually use something like "[PATCH weston v7]" to
identify the target, so filtering by subject should mostly work.
What do you think?
Would libinput want to be in patchwork?
The patch traffic for libinput is fairly low compared to wayland/weston
so I believe there is no urgent need, but still if patchwork can help
keeping track, maybe we can still try it out. The issue I see is that it
would not be as automatic as one could hope if the one who pushes don't
want to resubmit the patches on the ML after for example correcting
minor review issues. Have I understood it correctly that this would cause
patchwork not to close the issue? If that is the case, I think patchwork
would cause more burden than benefit right now.
yeah, that's pretty much what happens. if the patch isn't identical to the
one submitted on the list, you need manual intervention, and the same
applies for any changes in patch sets (you'd need to mark the old one as
obsolete). that results in patchwork quickly becoming a dumping ground if
no-one steps up to do that janitor work.

Cheers,
Peter
Pekka Paalanen
2014-10-07 09:23:31 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 5 Oct 2014 22:55:36 +1000
Post by Peter Hutterer
Post by Jonas Ådahl
Post by Pekka Paalanen
Hi,
at least with Wayland and Weston, we have bit of hard time tracking the
patches that need attention. I think I am currently the only one who
actually keeps a backlog, my backlog is not public, and I cannot be a
maintainer 100% all the time, so this won't scale or work for too long.
How about we started using http://patchwork.freedesktop.org/ ?
Apparently it works fine for Mesa et al., right?
I believe it picks up patch emails from the mailing lists automatically
and creates issues, and with a git hook at fd.o repos, a git-push can
automatically close issues.
There was also some command line tool for the patchwork database, IIRC.
It wouldn't change how we work: patches are good in the mailing list,
inline, we would still do review on the mailing list, etc. We would
just have an automatically maintained list of open patches.
http://lists.freedesktop.org/archives/mesa-dev/2013-November/049293.html
Wayland, Weston, and libinput. Is this a problem? Sometimes it is hard
for even humans to see which repository a patch is targeting.
From a quick chat with tfheen, it seems like patchwork assumes 1:1
between mailing lists and projects. OTOH, it looks like Xorg project in
patchwork gets patches to a myriad of different git repos, and you can
filter search results based on subject.
People do already usually use something like "[PATCH weston v7]" to
identify the target, so filtering by subject should mostly work.
What do you think?
Would libinput want to be in patchwork?
The patch traffic for libinput is fairly low compared to wayland/weston
so I believe there is no urgent need, but still if patchwork can help
keeping track, maybe we can still try it out. The issue I see is that it
would not be as automatic as one could hope if the one who pushes don't
want to resubmit the patches on the ML after for example correcting
minor review issues. Have I understood it correctly that this would cause
patchwork not to close the issue? If that is the case, I think patchwork
would cause more burden than benefit right now.
yeah, that's pretty much what happens. if the patch isn't identical to the
one submitted on the list, you need manual intervention, and the same
applies for any changes in patch sets (you'd need to mark the old one as
obsolete). that results in patchwork quickly becoming a dumping ground if
no-one steps up to do that janitor work.
Indeed, patchwork does not seem to be as automatic as we'd wish, but at
least it is a public backlog for Wayland and Weston. When a reviewer
finds an open timeslot, he can just look at patchwork to see what's
waiting, rather than searching for unanswered emails on the list.

Daniel has already set up Patchwork as a test, and currently it is
filtering out libinput patches based on the subject line prefix in []
somehow. So libinput patches should not be appearing in Patchwork at
all for now.


Thanks,
pq

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